Import your supplier scales, then look up costs by job or product.

Normally, you start the process of setting up a price scale by receiving a spreadsheet from a printer. If you are trying this feature out, use this sample scale (opens as a Google sheet).

1) Set up a supplier scale

Go to Production > Scales ⤴ and click the Add button.

The supplier price scales on this page define the prices that suppliers charge for general categories of service.

2) Fill in the new scale form

Hover over the question marks for guidance.

3) Click Save and add more information

Click Save. Once you have saved the basics, the page refreshes with two additional sections which allow you to add more costs information, and information about the elements that belong to this scale.

4) Add an element

Click the Add button in the Elements section. You see a new scale element page.

Fill in the form, then click Save. Add further details – this time about the supplier prices in the scale element.

Price elements

What are the three different types of prices?

Supplier scales are based on simple prices, list prices or matrix prices.

  • Simple prices are those for a given service that do not vary according to other factors. For example, a translation agency may charge GBP 0.08 per word, regardless of the number of words to be translated.
  • List prices. If the charge varied according to the total number of words (e.g. GBP 0.10 per word for products having a total number of words less than 10,000, and GBP 0.08 per word for products having greater than 10,000 words) then you need to use a list price instead of a simple price.
  • Matrix prices are generally sent to you as a table in a spreadsheet, with one value being column headings (e.g. number of units per print run), and one value being row headings (e.g. pages per printed unit)

Add a simple price

Click the Add button in the Simple price section.

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Fill in the form, then click Save. You can specify the following price units.

  • per job
  • per product
  • per unit
  • per page per product
  • per word
  • per page per unit
  • per image
  • per link

Commonly these might be the price for the entire job (e.g. for a litho print run), or a price per page (e.g. for proof-reading) or for a price per page per unit (e.g. for a POD print job). If in doubt, it is useful to consider what you would multiply the specified price by in order to get the total cost. For example, if you would multiply the price by the number of units printed and the number of pages per unit (i.e. by the total number of pages printed), then your price is per Page per Unit.

When you click Save you are taken back to the scale element that the price belongs to. You see your simple price, listed in the simple price card.

Add a list price

Also known as an X price, because they are based on only the x axis in a spreadsheet, unlike matrix prices which are based on values in the x and the y axis.

Click the Add button in the List price section. Fill in the form, then click Save. Hover over the question marks for guidance.

If the fields are hard to understand, enter some made up values as a test, and click save. Seeing the results of what you enter in the table on the scale element page can help.

When you click Save you are taken back to this list prices’ parent scale element.

Add a matrix price

Click the Add button in the matrix price section.

Fill in the form, then click Save. Hover over the question marks for guidance.

When you click Save, you return to the price’s parent scale element.